Art Therapy & Stop Motion animation workshop with Girls Inc

Art Campers from Girls Inc Halton visited the Milton Art as Therapy office and took part in an introduction to stop-motion led by Jane Kwon (Art Therapist and Animator) & Rapinder Kaur (Art Therapist & Psychotherapist). Learning different ways to tell their story and inspiring others and each other to be Smart Strong and Bold!

What’s the Difference between Art Therapy and an Art Class?

What’s the Difference between Art Therapy and an Art Class?

If you’re interested in art therapy or thinking about checking it out, you may be wondering what the difference is between art therapy and an art class. In fact, this is a question we are asked all the time, so we wanted to share some thoughts about it here on our blog.

From our perspective, these are the main differences between art therapy and an art class:

Art as Therapy’s Tips for Reducing the Power Struggle with your Kids

Art as Therapy’s Tips for Reducing the Power Struggle with your Kids

In our work with families, we often speak to parents who are experiencing defiance from their children and find themselves frustrated in a constant power struggle. How do you deal with these difficult moments? Is there a way to step out of the power struggle and instead stand beside your child and empower them in those moments?

Unlocking Inner Power through Positive Thinking: An Art Therapy Example

This month at Art as Therapy we are unlocking our powers of positive thinking through the use of positive affirmations. At Art as Therapy we believe that our thoughts have the power to change how we feel, how we behave, and ultimately what we believe about ourselves.

LET’S TALK about art therapy and mental health: taking care of our minds

LET’S TALK about art therapy and mental health: taking care of our minds

At Art as Therapy we are strong believers in the mind-body connection. In other words, the way that we think impacts the way that we feel, and the way that we feel in our physical bodies can impact the way that we think about ourselves and the world. 

Reframing Difficult Behaviours: A Fresh Perspective for a New Year

Reframing Difficult Behaviours: A Fresh Perspective for a New Year

Educational consultant Michael Reist makes the argument that difficult children grow up to be interesting adults. He looks at challenging traits in children and considers how these will serve them as adults. For example, an argumentative child has strong verbal communication skills, is passionate, and is intelligent. A disorganized child is more interested in the big picture, a stubborn child is able to set goals and work towards them, a child who doesn’t listen is able to tune out distractions and focus on a single task, and a defiant child is confident enough to stand up to authority figures. These are traits we often encourage or even try to develop in adolescents and young adults. 

Empowering Your Teen to Develop Discernment in a Media-Driven Culture

Empowering Your Teen to Develop Discernment in a Media-Driven Culture

Today more than ever, teens are constantly exposed to media. This includes the images and ads on billboards and in magazines that older generations were met with, but today’s children and teens are also exposed to ads on websites and in apps – these are even specifically targeted for them based on their online activities or interests.  Media is interactive and responsive – Netflix makes personalized recommendations, online shopping sites suggest similar items, and teens can like, comment, send, react, and curate what they see on multiple platforms. They can connect with friends and family, but there is also the possibility of connecting with strangers. The world is more virtually connected and accessible than ever before. While this offers many opportunities, it also raises questions about safety, the nature of relationships, sexuality, maturity, peer pressure, decision making, body image… the list is extensive.

Sharing Stories: Art Therapy and Watching Movies as a Family

Sharing Stories: Art Therapy and Watching Movies as a Family

In a Ted Talk filmed in July 2009, Chimamanda Adichie, a writer and storyteller, warns about the danger of a single story. She observes that we are impressionable and vulnerable in the face of a story, especially as children. If we only know one story about a place or a person, we see things from our single story and there is no possibility for anything else. When we make one story the only story, it can lead to stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue but that they are incomplete. Single stories rob people of dignity and make it very difficult for us to recognize our shared humanity. They emphasize how we are different rather than how we are the same. Adichie emphasizes that many stories matter, that stories can be used to empower and inspire people and can illuminate the ways that we are similar. She suggests that when we recognize that there is never a single story, we can regain a kind of paradise in this world.

Count Down with Acts of Kindness this Christmas with Art as Therapy

Count Down with Acts of Kindness this Christmas with Art as Therapy

The first 24 days of December are viewed for many as the official countdown to Christmas. Some communities refer to this time as advent. The word “advent” simply means the coming or arrival of a notable person, event or thing – in this context, the coming of Christmas.

Mindfulness through Art-Making: Intentional Time In

Mindfulness through Art-Making: Intentional Time In

November is a busy time of year. School and extra-curriculars are in full swing, and calendars rapidly begin filling up with social events and obligations as the holiday season approaches. During busy times we often talk about taking time to unplug or zone out in order to manage well. Have you ever tried what sounds like the complete opposite – intentionally taking time to zone in?